Tag Archives: money saving tips

Top Loyalty Cards And Rewards Programs For Filipino Families

Do you know that the small amounts of money you save on purchases can help a lot on your budgeting? Just take for example mobile phone promos. Telecom providers offer reward points every time you load up your prepaid number. The accumulated points can be redeemed for call and text promos, and free items such as electronic gadgets. Similar point system-based promos in the form of loyalty cards can save you serious money on groceries, medicines and other essentials (no, we’re not talking about the free flashlight batteries you get for buying thousands worth of items). Here are discount and loyalty cards every Filipino family must have.

Savings on groceries, clothes and toys

Savings on groceries, clothes and toys

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How much do you budget for your weekly groceries? A middle class family of five in Metro Manila likely spends around Php4,000 – 5,000 per week in the supermarket. Earn redeemable points every time you shop with a loyalty card that you can use to pay for future purchases. One example of a widely used grocery loyalty card is the SM Advantage card that also entitles cardholders enjoy special offers and freebies from external partners. For every Php400 you spend in SM Supermarket, SM Hypermarket, Save More and other retail partners, you earn 1 point. You can also get 1 point for every Php200 purchase made in SM Department Store, SM Cinema, Toy Kingdom, and other retailers. Moreover, you can use the SM Advantage card to earn points while you stay at Pico de Loro Beach & Country Club, Taal Vista Hotel and other hotel partners.

Loyalty card privileges on medicines and vitamins

Loyalty card privileges on medicines and vitamins

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Getting sick is expensive. It can easily ruin your budget, even drain your savings. Good thing the largest drugstore chain in the Philippines offers a customer loyalty card that can help you save on medicines, vitamins and medical supplies, among others. The Mercury Drug Suki Card is probably the most popular in this category. It allows you to accumulate points that you can use to pay future purchases. You can earn 1 Suki point for every Php200 receipt. Cardholders can get extra points, as much as 30 points, on featured products each month. The Suki Card also entitles you to the Suki Sabado Special where chosen items are offered at discounted prices. You can get about Php20 off on certain products.

Discounts, rebates and points on domestic remittances

Discounts, rebates and points on domestic remittances

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Do you regularly send money to your family in the province? You can get discounts and rebates on remittance fees with a loyalty card. The Palawan Pawnshop Suki Card – Palawan Express Pera Padala (PPS-PEPP) Suki Card allows you to earn points that can be used on future fees every time you send money. The points are equivalent to 2% of the fees collected per transaction. So if you’re paying Php50 in fees, you get 1 point or 2% of Php50.

Earn reward points on school supplies, art materials, etc.

Earn reward points on school supplies, art materials, etc.

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You probably spend around Php2,000 on school supplies before the start of classes and several hundred pesos every now and then for additional notebooks, art materials, etc. You can earn points that can be used to pay for subsequent purchases. One loyalty card you should have is the National Bookstore Laking National card. For every peso you spend on items (except certain purchases), you earn 1 point. You can start redeeming the points once you reach 1,000 points, which is equivalent to Php10 ePurse. You can then use your ePurse to pay for products and services in the store. You can get your Laking National card for Php100. Students can avail of this card for only Php60.

Discounts on school books

Discounts on school books

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Books are among the biggest purchases in a household with students. For college, law or medical students, reference books can rack up tens of thousands of pesos. Get big discounts on reference books, fiction and non-fiction titles, art materials and other items with a loyalty or discount card. Fully Booked, a specialty bookstore known for its vast selection of titles, including foreign bestsellers and hard-to-find classics, offers a discount card to its patrons. The Fully Booked discount card can save you 10% on cash purchases and 5% on credit card purchases on selected items. There’s a long list of exclusive promos such as the birthday discount on your birthday week, and perks from partner establishments, and discounted tickets at the Ayala Museum. You can avail of the Fully Booked discount card for Php700. You can get it for free if you’ve spent a total of Php15,000 in the store in a year or Php10,000 in a single visit.

Gas up and get free insurance and discount coupons

Gas up and get free insurance and discount coupons

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Fuel expenses can take up a huge chunk of your weekly allowance. This is one reason why many workers ditch their private cars and opt for public transport. But if you’re among those who can save more by driving, you should take note of loyalty cards and promos offered by fuel companies. The Petron Value Card allows you to accumulate redeemable points for every fuel purchase. You can earn 1 point with a value of Php1 for every Php250 spent in a Petron station. This Value Card also entitles you to a 24-hour towing and roadside trouble assistance, personal accident insurance and discounts on San Miguel Corporation products and other major establishments.

Discounts on lab tests, fuel and tuition fees

Discounts on lab tests, fuel and tuition fees

Photo courtesy of Rene Asmussen via Pexels

 

Business establishments are not the only ones offering amazing promos. The Pag-IBIG Loyalty Card offers discounts as much as 50% on laboratory tests in partner hospitals and clinics, dermatology clinics, optical clinics, drugstores courier services, and a long list of restaurants. This loyalty card can also be used to earn redeemable points for every purchase of Petron fuels, engine oils and gasul. The Pag-IBIG Loyalty Card, arguably the card with the widest coverage, can be used to get tuition fee discounts in selected schools You can enjoy these privileges from national and provincial partner retailers for a card fee of Php100.

Every peso you save on your purchases can make a difference on your finances. Don’t shrug off the discounts and promos you can avail. Get the most from your hard-earned money by signing up for loyalty cards.

 

This article was written by:

Jeanette Anzon is the writer and editor for AdventureDweller.com. She mostly write about home improvements, home guides and designs, and real estate investments.

What is Delayed Gratification?

The Power of Delayed Gratification

It’s just recently that I came to discover the word “delayed gratification”.  The words are now more used by financial gurus in delivering motivational speaks to individuals who want to learn more about saving and investing.

So what is a “delayed gratification”? According to Wikipedia, Delayed gratification, or deferred gratification, is the ability to resist the temptation for an immediate reward and wait for a later reward. Generally, delayed gratification is associated with resisting a smaller but more immediate reward in order to receive a larger or more enduring reward later.

In general, its meaning pertains to the many things in life. And if we associate it to achieving our financial goals, these two words are one of the powerful driving forces that we can still in our mind to discipline ourselves in saving money.  Aside from my ever battle between “wants” and “needs” each time I’m tempted to buy something, I always think of how this little money that I will indulge to a thing that can bring me temporary happiness to me will affect the longevity of happiness I could have when I already achieved my goal.

So if you are really serious about saving and getting your financial goals, think about and practice “delayed gratification”. I bet you,  this mind set will spare you from buying things that you don’t really need for now!

 

Photo credit: creativitypost.com

 

Liza's own pork barrel

Meet Shisha

Since the inception of this blog, I have been thinking what could be the topic of my first post. Honestly, I’ve listed down several money saving topics on the side but then, I decided to post about Shisha. (“,)

Liza's own pork barrel

I remember having my first coin bank when I was in Kinder.  Since then I would always buy different coin banks and fill those with the Pamasko’s and excess baon’s I have. I had my last coin bank when I was in my third year college.

When I got my first salary as an IT worker in 2004, I had a hundred peso bill placed inside a book  (I will try to find later and post here) which will serve as a remembrance.  From then on, I tried to save money but for almost two years of working, I remember giving in several times to temptations of buying things which I don’t really need.  Until one day, I got a news that our company has filed a bankruptcy and will soon close.  It was my last day at work.

When I got home and looked at my passbook, I realized that I only had Php 20,000 and that’s all. Suddenly, I woke up to the fact that I no longer have a job and so unsure about how long will it take me to find another one.  I had several financial obligations during that time and somehow worried.  When I got my second job a month after,  I made a pact to myself that I will save money as long as I can.

Yesterday, I decided to buy a new piggy bank which I named Shisha. This will contain all the excess money I have reserved for the bills and whenever I have something left from my personal monthly allowance. This is separate from my savings and emergency funds which are both in the bank. Today, I deposited to her Php150.00 from the change when I paid my PLDT bill. I normally reserve Php 2,000 for PLDT each month.

Until I’m sure where to use the money that I kept in Shisha, her mouth will remain unopened. See the date?

8 Jars Money Strategy

Miriam Quiambao 8 Money Jars System on Saving and Investing

8 Jars Money StrategyFor the past years, Liza and I were into saving money and living frugal lives. We often talk, share and encourage each other on how we can build our wealth. Then one day we saw Miriam Quiambao in her recent interview with ANC about her money strategy – 8 Jar System.

Everyone knows Miriam Quiambao as one of the Philippines beauty queens but we saw a different side of her on that interview which inspired us to start this blog and share our money saving tips.

On that interview Miriam Quiambao shared her 8 Jar System on savings and investing. Each of the 8 jars represents a particular purpose where she puts her money.

Miriam Quiambao 8 Money Jars System:

Jar 1: Tithe (10%)
Jar 2: Growth (20%)
Jar 3: Tax (10% or 15%)
Jar 4: Learn (10%)
Jar 5: Live (35%)
Jar 6: Save (5%)
Jar 7: Play (5%)
Jar 8: Share (5%)

Percentages on these jars can be adjusted based on your needs and lifestyle. By the way, those jars are just for illustration purposes so that you can easily visualize and manage your money and savings. You can opt to use envelopes (which I use) or open small bank accounts instead of Jars and manage them manually or via online banking. What’s important is that you should have discipline and strong will if you want to adopt Miriam Quiambao 8 Jar system or any money saving systems in order for you to succeed and reach financial freedom.

If you want to find out more about Miriam Quaimbao 8 Jars System and how saving money NOW can help you in the future watch this segment of Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho about money savings.

Miriam Quiambao’s Money Strategy